Mixed Minerals!

A selection of mixed minerals from around the world!

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EIV01 Fluorite, Calcite, Sphalerite
Elmwood Mine, Carthage, Smith Co., Tennessee, United States
13.8x 13.2x 10.1 cm
$1380

A great example of orange calcites on a sphalerite matrix, with minor fluorite. The main cluster and the smaller doubly terminated crystals immediately near it are perfect, only the one way off to the side has any tip issues. I could have trimmed it before posting, but decided to leave it as is.  

The prices of Elmwood material have fluctuated somewhat ridiculously over the last several years-- every time the mine opened or closed speculation seemed to clash with basic supply and demand in one direction or another.  Some years in Tucson I would hear dealers complaining that it was impossible to sell, other years it would be the "hot item"..... All I know is that most pieces tend to have cleaves in exactly the wrong locations. The big impressive "footballs" are more often than not cleaved, rendering them less impressive... I chose this one because the main cluster is perfect (though again, only the crystal way off to the side is not). 











EIV02 Opal Belemnite
Coober Pedy, South Australia, Australia
14.0x 8.2x 5.1 cm
$1300

A beautiful example of a belemnite that has been replaced by water/ crystal opal, from the famous opal fields of South Australia. Belemnites were somewhat like today's cuttlefish and squid-- only they had an internal skeleton-- that is what was left behind, replaced by opal and fossilized. This one has been carefully prepared to expose the beautiful fossilized tube-- about 95% complete. 







EIV03 Galena with Chalcopyrite
Sweetwater Mine, Reynolds Co., Viburnum Trend Dist., Missouri, United States
12.0x 6.0x 2.8 cm
$285

A very beautiful example of octahedral galena with iridescent chalcopyrite, from recent discoveries in the Viburnum Trend District of eastern Missouri. Usually chalcopyrite is treated to yield the colorful "peacock ore," those these acquired their color naturally.  Although this piece doesn't have any calcite, I inspected a number of others that did-- the calcite would have been destroyed (or at the very least, the surfaces would have shown obvious signs of etching) had these been treated after extraction.   All in all, it's a very pretty combination of this usually dull mineral-- and I'd also point out that octahedrons are a bit less common than the standard cubes. 







EIV04 Smoky Quartz
Mooralla, Victoria, Australia
6.3x 4.1x 4.1 cm
$195

A nice cluster of smoky quartz crystals on a pleasantly shaped, lightly concave matrix from Australia. A couple tiny chips present. 









EIV05 Elbaite Tourmaline
Santa Rosa Mine, Itambacuri, Minas Gerais Brazil
8.5x 6.1x 4.7 cm
$565

A nice example of green tourmaline with feldspar, from Miners Gerais, Brazil. 







EIV06 Pyrite
Huanzala Mine, Huallanca District, Dos de Mayo Prov., Peru
4.5x 4.0x 3.7 cm
$150

A salient octahedral pyrite crystal, nicely positioned on a pyrite matrix. Huanzala produces most of the pyrite you see for sale-- whether it's in a gift shop or a craft store.  Most of those are clusters of small dodecahedrons however, along with cubic crystals those are the most common forms.  Octahedrons, or "triangulos" as the locals call them, are considered the least common.  







EIV07 Diamond
West Africa
0.53x 0.47x 0.40 cm
$840

A beautifully twinned, 0.82 ct diamond crystal, this one a somewhat rare "Star of David."The star shape is more apparent from some angles than others, I've tried to show it from the angle that conveys this most clearly, as well as the back (which also shows the twining quite well) and side. 









EIV08 Barite on Sphalerite
Elmwood Mine, Carthage, Smith Co., Tennessee, United States
11.6x 8.6x 5.1 cm
$285

A pair of barite "snowballs" on a cluster of dark, reddish-brown sphalerite. Classic material from the Elmwood Mine, and rather well-balanced visually. 







EIV09 Strontianite with Fluorite
Hardin Co., Illinois, United States
7.8x 5.1x 1.8 cm
$360

An excellent example of strontianite from the Southern Illinois Fluorspar District. Along with the fluorites that this area is famous for, the mines in this district also produced exceptional examples of several rare (almost everywhere else) carbonates.   This piece consists of a pair of wheatsheaf-like clusters, with a tiny scrap of fluorite near the base. 







EIV10 Galena with Chalcopyrite
Sweetwater Mine, Reynolds Co., Viburnum Trend Dist., Missouri, United Statese
10.6x 8.0x 5.3 cm
$295

A very beautiful example of galena with iridescent chalcopyrite, from recent discoveries in the Viburnum Trend District of eastern Missouri. Usually chalcopyrite is treated to yield the colorful "peacock ore," those these acquired their color naturally.  Although this piece doesn't have any calcite, I inspected a number of others that did-- the calcite would have been destroyed (or at the very least, the surfaces would have shown obvious signs of etching) had these been treated after extraction.   This one has a matte gray crystal on the side of a matrix richly coated with vibrant chalcopyrite crystals. 









EIV11 Fluorite
Hardin Co., Illinois, United States
10.5x 6.3x 4.2 cm
$285

A floater cluster of dark purple fluorite crystals, under slightly stronger lighting (such as int he light box where I photographed it) the dark purple phantoms pop out. 









EIV12 Pyrite
Jiangxi Prov., China
19.1x 12.7x 3.4 cm
$365

A large calcite-covered plate, with lightly iridescent hemispherical aggregates of dodecahedral pyrite crystals.  From a recent find. 









EIV12A Azurite
Bisbee, Arizona, United States
2.9x 2.1x 2.6 cm
$125

A spherical aggregate of blue azurite crystals, from the famous Bisbee copper mining area.  







EIV13 Fluorite
Clay Center, Ottawa County, Ohio, United States
2.7x 2.2x 1.7 cm
$135

A great thumbnail of brown fluorite from finds made over 15 years ago at Clay Center, Ohio.  This one features a sharp crystal with a light brown phantom, associated with minor celestite. 









EIV14 Pyrite, Chalcopyrite, and Quartz
Boldut Mine, Cavnic, Marmures Co., Romania
13.5x 6.8x 5.1 cm
$295

A beautiful cluster of transparent quartz crystals, sprinkled with chalcopyrite and pyrite.  These  specimens were quite abundant in the 90's, though when Romania joined the EU many of the once-prolific mines closed.  This piece was brought back by Ross Lillie, though it doesn't have his label







EIV15 Ilvaite
Huanggang Mine, Hexigten Banner (Keshiketeng Co.), Ulanhad League (Chifeng Prefecture), Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
7.5x 6.6x 3.5 cm
$395

A lustrous cluster of ilvaite crystals, from a center find at the Huanggang Mine.  Ilvaites were among the first species to come from this locality back around 2010, then they largely stopped coming out.  The ilvaite from here is undoubtedly the world's best, surpassing anything from the other locations that were particularly well known for the species, most notably Serifos and Dal'Negorsk.  This comes from an early 2022 pocket.  







EIV16 Copper
Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan, United States
5.6x 3.5x 0.6 cm
$175

A cluster of flattened copper crystals that looks kind of like a cat..... or the Pokemon mew. 







EIV17 Fluorite, Calcite, Sphalerite
Georgetown Quarry, Scott Co., Kentucky, United States
9.9x 5.6x 4.4 cm
$200

Although the Southern Illinois fluorspar district gets a lot of attention from collectors, there is also a Central Kentucky fluorspar district.  This piece is a doubly terminated crystal, and comes from a quarry just north of Lexington.  Clean contact on the back







EIV18 Sand Included Calcite
Rattlesnake Butte, Jackson Co., South Dakota, United States
9.8x 6.3x 5.7 cm
$195

A very three-dimensional example of this very distinctive, old American material. 







EIV19 Galena with Sphalerite
Tri-State Lead Zinc District, Oklahoma-Kansas-Missouri Border Area, United States
6.9x 5.2x 3.7 cm
$235

A very old specimen of galena, with a pair of cubes sharing their matrix with scattered crystals of "ruby jack" sphalerite.  Many of the mines in the area connected underground, even across state lines, and records were rarely kept as to which exact location they came from.  As such, I always label these "Tri-State District" unless I have a reliable old label-- and that is almost never the case.  

Although galena continues to be produced in the Viburnum trend district (eastern Missouri), this area encompassing the western Missouri, Oklahoma and Kansas border area saw its last mine close in 1967. Some of the workings remained accessible to collecting for a while, until it finally became a superfund site and was cleaned up. 







EIV20 Quartz, Manganocalcite, Sphalerite
Boldut Mine, Cavnic, Marmures Co., Romania
9.2x 5.4x 5.8 cm
$165

A beautiful cluster of quartz crystals, overgrown in places by manganocalcite, and associated with sphalerite.  These specimens were quite abundant in the 90's, though when Romania joined the EU many of the once-prolific mines closed.  This piece was brought back by Ross Lillie, though it doesn't have his label-- it does however have that clean, sharpness that the pieces he imported typically do.... there was just *so much* of this material available wholesale (kind of like Bulgarian minerals today) but there are still some specimens that lack the damage and random visual composition that the wholesale stuff always has....his selections always just seemed cleaner.   







EIV21 Fluorite
Dal'Negorsk, Primorskiy Kray, Russia
4.2x 3.5x 2.3 cm
$225

A nice cluster of colorless fluorite with slightly frosted surfaces, on a sliver of matrix. This comes from Dal'Negorsk, near Russia's Pacific coast. 







EIV22 Quartz
Idarado Mine, Ouray Co., Colorado, United States
8.6x 5.6x 5.1 cm
$135

A nice example of quartz from an old Pb-Cu-Zn mine in Colorado that closed in 1978. 







EIV23 Siderite after Calcite
Turt Mine, Satu Mare, Marmures Co., Romania
7.4x 2.9x 2.0 cm
$185

A nice example of a siderite epimorph of calcite, from a mine that has been intermittently worked since medieval times.  







EIV24 Quartz
Cumbria, England, United Kingdom
8.6x 6.7x 3.6 cm
$165

A cluster of Cumberland habit quartz crystals from Cumberland, or rather Cumbria as the area was renamed in 1974. The piece had an old label that still said "Cumberland," so my guess is the piece predates the renaming/merger of those administrative regions.  The colors not quite as smoky in person.. its more of a gray.







EIV25 Ulexite
U.S. Borax Mine, Boron, Kern Co., California, United States
7.4x 7.1x 3.1 cm
$185

This ugly fossilized-mushroom-looking thing is probably one of the most interesting rocks in the update... an actual cluster of ulexite crystals.  Ulexite is commonly polished and sold as "tv stone,"-- in that case, the  the tightly packed, parallel crystals have fiber optic-like qualities and project the image of whatever is below the flat polished piece to its top surface.... but you don't often see crystalized specimens.  This one has an accompanying label, stating that was was purchased in 1993 from a woman in Michigan, and that her father has self collected it-- it doesn't really add any value, but it does add a bit of a story to this already interesting and unusual piece. 







EIV26 Painite
Wetloo, Kyauk-Pyat-That, Mogok Township, Myanmar (Burma)
2.3x 1.0x 0.6 cm
$285

A nice thumbnail sized crystal section of painite. Painite was long considered world's rarest gemstone, with fewer than 20 carefully documented crystals having been collected since its discovery in the 1950's.  Then in late 2005, there was a large find of the stuff that finally made them available to collectors.  Those seem to have dried up, though at least they are obtainable now!







EIV27 Datolite
Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan, United States
7.0x 6.0x 2.6 cm
$150

A decently sized, polished half of a datolite nodule from Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The brownish color comes from minute copper inclusions-- actually, if you look at the rind you will see tiny green dots instead of brown ones; the same copper that has retained its brownish-red color inside the nodule has oxidized to green from exposure to the elements on the nodule's surface.







EIV28 Wulfenite
Tsumeb Mine, Otjikoto Region, Namibia
3.3x 3.2x 1.0 cm
$125

A large wulfenite crystal with a matte luster and a bit of matrix running through it. This piece has an old type-written "Kytes' Collections" label with a $4.00 price tag and a Virginia PO box listed... I would guess this piece dates to the 1970's.









EIV29 Sphalerite
Auglaize Quarry, Junction, Paulding Co., Ohio, United States
8.4x 5.7x 4.8 cm
$150

A very good example of sphalerite from he Auglaize Quarry, this location is mainly known for its iridescent and purple phantom fluorites, as well as its calcite.   Sphalerite is one of the less frequently occurring minerals at this well known Midwestern locality. This one has a bit of shearing, but is exceptionally rich.  







EIV30 Galena
Tri-State Lead Zinc District, Oklahoma-Kansas-Missouri Border Area, United States
5.5x 5.2x 4.0 cm
$140

A very old specimen of galena, consisting of a single, hefty crystal on a bit of matrix.  Many of the mines in the area connected underground, even across state lines, and records were rarely kept as to which exact location they came from.  As such, I always label these "Tri-State District" unless I have a reliable old label-- and that is almost never the case.  

Although galena continues to be produced in the Viburnum trend district (eastern Missouri), this area encompassing the western Missouri, Oklahoma and Kansas border area saw its last mine close in 1967. Some of the workings remained accessible to collecting for a while, until it finally became a superfund site and was cleaned up. 









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